Can your Trustees read the Signs & Portents?

 While I was waiting for last night’s wonderful lunar eclipse to show us its spectacular ‘blood moon’, I was reading about the religious leaders prophesying that this event, the last in a tetrad of similar events, would be the herald of the endtime.  Cheerful stuff at 3am!  

By utilising a combination of documentary evidence, quotes and a sprinkling of rather odd beliefs, they are happy to predict the coming of all manner of horrors for us all.  But here’s the interesting bit – each predicts a timetable which supports their own particular theory and all would like to take credit for being the first to make the prediction of doom.  Nor do they seem to mind that not many others are buying into their forecasts.

So what has all this got to do with Trustee Boards and the non-profits? 

The comparison with some Boards with a history of under-performance seems rather marked. The ability to look at what is happening within their organisations is fairly skewed by either outmoded beliefs or lack of skills and, sadly, the example of good practice in other organisations is largely ignored because they've always done it this way and it must be right – right? Definitely not.

All organisations face a landscape of continuous change and must regularly look outside to ensure they can respond effectively to the coming needs of members or those who receive their services.  It’s when the blinkers go up that trouble can find a way in.  If outside advice is not sought or welcomed, however sensible or appropriate, then the drawbridge has been drawn up and you don’t need to be a visionary to imagine what’s coming next.

Avoiding the doomsday scenario is so simple.  Regular and searching reviews of all aspects of the work and structure of the Board and its relationship with the organisation it serves will provide future-proofing and security. No mysticism needed.

Why we all need support - especially CEOs

This month I’m returning to a subject that is as important as it gets for the ongoing welfare of non-profit organisations – how the leaders within this very varied sector are able to flourish as individuals while remaining in charge of the destiny of their organisations. 

It is almost impossible to pick up an article or book about successful leaders and entrepreneurs these days without finding a story or quote about how that individual derived enormous benefit from having a mentor at some stage of their career.  Mentoring has been going on for a very long time – famous relationships include Socrates and Plato, Aristotle and Alexander the Great, and more recently Freddie Laker and Richard Branson.  Indeed, government statistics show that 70% of small businesses whose leaders receive mentoring survive for five years or more, which is double the rate compared with non-mentored entrepreneurs and, in addition, they are 20% more likely to experience growth. 

We know that a CEO crisis line has just published data to say that it has received twice as many calls this year as last.  So, if it is true that the leaders within our sector are increasingly aware of the need to run their organisations as successful businesses while also being under incredible pressure from all sides, and if it’s also true that leaders of all kinds benefit from having a mentor, why do so very few Chief Executives, senior management or Board Chairs have mentors?

 

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Why Professional Competence is all about Comfort and Security

I’ve spent the past few weeks living away from home while we had some plumbing issues dealt with.  Now I’m back and settling once again into my own space. While returning my home to some semblance of order, it is time to take stock of an acutely uncomfortable experience which has unexpectedly offered me an insight into the value of how we use our professional competences. 

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Will it fly? Take a risk and grab those opportunities

I discovered something recently that I’d like to share.  It starts with me admitting that I like poetry.  Although I know it’s not everyone’s cup of tea I read it sporadically, I even write a little.  I’m not sure mine is very good but it pleases me.  One day I may even come clean and show it to someone.

In most areas of our lives we can be creatures of habit, liking the comfort of familiarity.  Hands up, I do too.  In my poetry choices I tend to turn to poems I know well and perhaps have loved for a long time, because they evoke an expected reaction, a response that I recognise and find pleasing or comforting depending on what I need that day.

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But we already know that, don't we?

As the Paralympics begin this evening, there have already been many discussions and column inches devoted to the lessons to be learned from the Olympic and Paralympic Games.  In light of the incredible positivity surrounding the activities and efforts of the last few weeks, from sportsmen and volunteers alike, commentators are looking for the knock-on effect which could be applied in fields other than sport, especially the possibilities for business in emulating our medal winners. It would make perfect sense to point to the collective pursuit of excellence as the explanation for the successes on display.  Individual sportsmen working with and for each other and the team as a whole, creating success by solid effort and an unshakable belief in the quest to do better.  The contrast with the superficiality of some aspects of our culture could not be greater but is rarely thrown into such sharp relief.

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R.E.D. and G.O.L.D. – an auspicious focus for the coming Year of the Dragon

Tomorrow sees the start of the Chinese Year of the Dragon, believed to be the most auspicious year in the calendar, with red and gold as the auspicious colours for the New Year.  They are also great shorthand to think about how we approach the coming year and what it may hold for us, both at work and in our personal lives.

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Wow! I'm a trend setter - that's reassuring

After a blustery and challenging week I find myself with a big smile on my face this morning.  As the year winds down and we all start to look forward to what the next one brings it seems that I am way ahead of the game. What a delightful surprise! The Pantone Color Institute have announced what they believe will be the colour of 2012 - and it just happens to be the colour I chose as my corporate livery some time ago!  If  you have one of my business cards or have visited The Professionalism Group's website then you will recognise the lovely, warm colour instantly.  The particular shade is apparently called Tangerine Tango and was chosen, according to Leatrice Eiseman, executive director of the Pantone Color Institute, because it is "reminiscent of the radiant shadings of a sunset and marries the vivaciousness and adrenaline rush of red with the friendliness and warmth of yellow, to form a high-visibility, magnetic hue that emanates heat and energy.”  Doesn't that sound great?  She went on to say that their choice of orange is because of its association with urgency and calling to action and added: “Consumers look to Spring for renewed energy, optimism and the promise of a brighter day.”

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Reach out – I’ll be there

The title of this post is an old song title from the Four Tops.  It’s amazing how old song lyrics can get you thinking.  The song is all about support systems and asking for help when you need it and, hearing the song the other day, that thought collided with some statistics I heard a few days ago. You can’t possibly have missed the fact that it is only a few weeks to the holiday season and you are probably starting to think about what you might be giving to those around you as gifts – well you will be soon if you haven’t started just yet! There is one person, however, that most of us don’t include on our gift list and that is ourselves.

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WANTED – Brave, forward thinking NfP organisation

Back in 2008 Kevin Kelly put forward the idea of 1KTF – One Thousand True Fans (http://bit.ly/2PQqaE) – as the sustainable number of individuals required to support an artist to survive by buying their artistic output or products directly.  These fans are, in turn, surrounded by much larger numbers of Lesser Fans who are not quite as devoted but can be persuaded to get involved.  One of the ways in which this works is for fans to be involved in pre-financing, where the artist makes a statement such as “When I get £xxx in donations I will release the next novel in this series”. This should translate really well as a fundraising route for professional associations and membership organisations which already have a dedicated fan base - their membership.

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The hidden cost of meetings? “Consider this” (2)

“A committee is a cul-de-sac down which ideas are lured and then quietly strangled “ (Sir Barnett Cocks)

It’s Monday morning and you probably looked at your diary or calendar last night to see what the coming week looks like. Did you smile and predict that this is going to be a productive week, you have some things planned but you also have some clear space which will allow you leeway for following up exciting ideas or resolving urgent issues. Or did your heart sink because the week ahead is full of recurrent weekly, monthly, quarterly meetings which only happen because the need for them is long lost in the mists of time or it’s always been done this way?

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