Why we all need support - especially CEOs

This month I’m returning to a subject that is as important as it gets for the ongoing welfare of non-profit organisations – how the leaders within this very varied sector are able to flourish as individuals while remaining in charge of the destiny of their organisations. 

It is almost impossible to pick up an article or book about successful leaders and entrepreneurs these days without finding a story or quote about how that individual derived enormous benefit from having a mentor at some stage of their career.  Mentoring has been going on for a very long time – famous relationships include Socrates and Plato, Aristotle and Alexander the Great, and more recently Freddie Laker and Richard Branson.  Indeed, government statistics show that 70% of small businesses whose leaders receive mentoring survive for five years or more, which is double the rate compared with non-mentored entrepreneurs and, in addition, they are 20% more likely to experience growth. 

We know that a CEO crisis line has just published data to say that it has received twice as many calls this year as last.  So, if it is true that the leaders within our sector are increasingly aware of the need to run their organisations as successful businesses while also being under incredible pressure from all sides, and if it’s also true that leaders of all kinds benefit from having a mentor, why do so very few Chief Executives, senior management or Board Chairs have mentors?

 

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Why Professional Competence is all about Comfort and Security

I’ve spent the past few weeks living away from home while we had some plumbing issues dealt with.  Now I’m back and settling once again into my own space. While returning my home to some semblance of order, it is time to take stock of an acutely uncomfortable experience which has unexpectedly offered me an insight into the value of how we use our professional competences. 

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Will it fly? Take a risk and grab those opportunities

I discovered something recently that I’d like to share.  It starts with me admitting that I like poetry.  Although I know it’s not everyone’s cup of tea I read it sporadically, I even write a little.  I’m not sure mine is very good but it pleases me.  One day I may even come clean and show it to someone.

In most areas of our lives we can be creatures of habit, liking the comfort of familiarity.  Hands up, I do too.  In my poetry choices I tend to turn to poems I know well and perhaps have loved for a long time, because they evoke an expected reaction, a response that I recognise and find pleasing or comforting depending on what I need that day.

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But we already know that, don't we?

As the Paralympics begin this evening, there have already been many discussions and column inches devoted to the lessons to be learned from the Olympic and Paralympic Games.  In light of the incredible positivity surrounding the activities and efforts of the last few weeks, from sportsmen and volunteers alike, commentators are looking for the knock-on effect which could be applied in fields other than sport, especially the possibilities for business in emulating our medal winners. It would make perfect sense to point to the collective pursuit of excellence as the explanation for the successes on display.  Individual sportsmen working with and for each other and the team as a whole, creating success by solid effort and an unshakable belief in the quest to do better.  The contrast with the superficiality of some aspects of our culture could not be greater but is rarely thrown into such sharp relief.

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