Professionalism at work in the holiday season

Just as I was settling down on the train yesterday for a nice relaxed ride home, I overheard the lady next to me say to her travelling companion ‘Did you know Christmas Day is three weeks tomorrow?’  Talk about panic stations!  Am I ready – I am not!  Have I done anything about anything – I have not!  This has all the makings of a Christmas Eve whirlwind  but I have pulled this particular rabbit out a hat before so I am not overly worried.  Not just yet anyway! Organisations, however, need to be just a little bit more prepared and, in difficult times, will hopefully have been a bit inventive this year on the thorny question of  WHAT  TO  DO ABOUT THE  CHRISTMAS  PARTY.  An interesting subset of that discussion will also have revolved around bonuses or rewards for a year of effort and, hopefully, successes.


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So funny but so sad!

When I found this picture recently my first instinct, like yours no doubt, was to laugh uproariously.  It is hilarious.  However, it only takes a split second to then realise that it is one of the saddest and most damning indictments of laziness and total lack of professionalism that I have ever seen.  We definitely have a very long way to go to make professionalism everyone’s preferred option.  But then we’d lose gems like this!  Talk about caught between a rock and a hard place.

 

The hidden cost of meetings? “Consider this” (2)

“A committee is a cul-de-sac down which ideas are lured and then quietly strangled “ (Sir Barnett Cocks)

It’s Monday morning and you probably looked at your diary or calendar last night to see what the coming week looks like. Did you smile and predict that this is going to be a productive week, you have some things planned but you also have some clear space which will allow you leeway for following up exciting ideas or resolving urgent issues. Or did your heart sink because the week ahead is full of recurrent weekly, monthly, quarterly meetings which only happen because the need for them is long lost in the mists of time or it’s always been done this way?

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Standards not noise

In the last few years the advent of an assortment social media applications has meant that many professional associations have been quick to see the possibilities offered by these new communication and networking routes and have begun to utilise as many as possible. They offer obvious benefits and opportunities to access large numbers of people, elicit opinions or motivate through almost instant communication of ideas. Yet it is worth questioning how many of these organisations will have taken the time to identify the strategic intent or benefit of these activities, both for the organisation and for the membership as a whole.

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Professional Associations as hubs

In the last few years mathematicians working on small world phenomena have developed network theory which looks set to revolutionise the way we think about our global systems of interconnectivity.The theory talks about naturally occurring hubs which form as communities of interest of one sort or another.They drive and make sense of the ways in which we are able to connect with known and not-yet-known individuals across the globe and are the basis for the success and rise of multiple social media formats.This blog is a perfect example of me reaching out to like-minded individuals who share my beliefs about the critical importance of professionalism.The theory is also the basis for the concept of six degrees of separation.For those of you who may not be familiar with this idea take a look at the Kevin Bacon Game or check out Google or Wikipaedia entries, which seek to explain how you are no more than six steps removed from anyone on the planet.

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